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  1. Turbo


    For what it's worth, the Pitot tube probe head need not be very far below the wing's lower surface.  It just has to be clear of the viscous boundary layer of the wing's lower surface.  This is typically very thin, like a few hundredths of an inch, unless, of course, the flow under there is separated (not too likely!).  It senses the total pressure, i.e. the sum of static pressure and ram, impact, or dynamic pressure.  The total pressure is totally unaffected by the static pressure field around the wing - as long as it's clear of the viscous boundary layer around the wing at that location.  The total pressure is very easy to measure correctly, as the probe can even be misaligned by, say, 10 degrees, and the total pressure error will be less than 1%.  Align the probe tip parallel to the aircraft centerline and parallel with the wing's lower surface at the probe tip location, and you're good to go.  I say all this since a large standoff increases the chances of the probe being damaged.  The IAS is reckoned from the difference between total and static pressure.

    The real airspeed error comes from the static pressure measurement, which is fiendishly difficult to get right.  What do they do on our airplanes?  Just leave the static port on the ASI open to the cockpit pressure, and live with the very systematic error.  We could calibrate out this error if we could get a good static pressure.  Static pressure is influenced by the airplane's presence, so getting a good one involves  putting the static pressure probe sufficiently far away to zero those effects, and somehow nulling out the AOA & yaw effects.

    -Turbo, reired Boeing aerodynamicist and former associate professor of aerospace engineering, Avid C owner

  2. Browning


    I'm defiantly interested in your prop north Idaho. I will let you know once out figure out what direction I'm headed. Being here in Utah I think I'm going to need a serious climb prop. No cruising here. 

    1 person likes this
  3. Browning


    My plane came with 2 gsc props. There is a 68 stamped on the backs. One is smaller on the ends than the other. Are these any good. 

    20190118_110852.jpg

    One blade should not be smaller on the end than the other. If you are looking for another prop I have a GSC three blade 64" with LE protection I'll make you a good deal on. I got a smoking deal on a Warp so I bought it.   Thanks for all the help everyone. Makes this a lot easier. 

  4. marksires


    Thanks for posting the video Mark.  Who makes the instrument in the center of your panel with the artificial horizon on it?  What can you tell me about it.  Also curious about the reserve lift indicator.  What are your thoughts on it?  JImChuk

    The artificial horizon is a Garmin G-5

    1 person likes this
  5. wypaul


    Ok, thanks for your comment. The issue that you bring up is valid and with that said we have the main struts totally covered with wood and fabric, the fuselage and wings are also covered.  I guess that if I lived near salt air and/or flying off floats I would be more concerned but where I live and fly the climate is very dry.  Also I have no problem drilling out rivets for inspection.  Once again I sincerely  thank you for your concern and comments.

    1 person likes this
  6. 1avidflyer


    Thanks for posting the video Mark.  Who makes the instrument in the center of your panel with the artificial horizon on it?  What can you tell me about it.  Also curious about the reserve lift indicator.  What are your thoughts on it?  JImChuk

  7. NorthIdahoAvidflyer


    My plane came with 2 gsc props. There is a 68 stamped on the backs. One is smaller on the ends than the other. Are these any good. 

    20190118_110852.jpg

    One blade should not be smaller on the end than the other. If you are looking for another prop I have a GSC three blade 64" with LE protection I'll make you a good deal on. I got a smoking deal on a Warp so I bought it.

     

  8. Allen Sutphin


    does Andy still run the show over there?

    Yes, but not as much as before. Too many irons in the fire. He went to Sebring Monday for the LSA show. He has a couple of good people working for him now. He now owns Stewart Systems, plus has a repair shop #2 in the Midwest.  But still has time to answer any questions one would have.

    1 person likes this
  9. 1avidflyer


    if it starts lumping up, you can put the cans in some hot water and it will soften up and you can mix it right up and it will smooth right back out again.  Let it cool before you try to mix the 2 parts together though unless you want it to set a lot faster!

    :BC:

    I did try heating up some old hysol, and it did seem to soften up and when mixed up it hardened up.  I used it on something that wasn't critical though, cause I'm not sure how much to trust it.  The Scotchweld  doesn't seemed to have changed consistency in 25 years.  The scotchweld I use for the plane is only about 2 years old though.  JImChuk

     

  10. NorthIdahoAvidflyer


    I had mine after 43 hours. I would not say I was cocky but more complacent. I was coming back from my longest cross country trip. I was tired and in a hurry to get home for a dinner engagement with my wife. I listened to AWOS at my home airport and it reported 23 @ 7. We have a 24 runway so i decided to use it. When I started monitoring the airport frequency the traffic was using 20. Instead of landing on 24 like I had planned I decided to land 20 with the other traffic. When I tuned final I was directly into the sun. I flared to high and sat down crossed up. I could not see but thought I could make it work. The next thing I remember was seeing the yellow center line out my left door. I over corrected with left rudder and was stabbing in left rudder to fix that when the tailwheel broke loose. The good thing was I had slowed the plane down a lot. As I felt it going around I leaned right and dove right aileron into the turn. She stayed on her feet and did a beautiful spin clear around on the runway. I sat there thinking "God I hope no one saw that". I looked across the taxiway and there stood the fuel truck driver with a big smile on his face. Asshole...... :)

    What did I learn. Runway 24 would have kept me out of the sun, would have gave me less of a crosswind component and would have put me closer to my hangar. As soon as I turned final I told myself that I should go around and use 24....I didn't listen.  Fly the plan, go around if it does not feel right, stack the odds in your favor as much as possible when flying a short coupled TB and stay in control of the plane.  

  11. akflyer


    You do quite well with the helmet cam. Most I cant even watch but you stay nice and steady so nice work.

    And just to stir the pot a bit I see you pointing at your rpm and air speed ha. my Jabiru runs half those RPM at that speed hahaha  

    That is a good point.  Have you checked the tach against a tiny tach?   That analog tac is NORTORIOUS for being way off.  Your fuel burn is quite a bit more than mine too on take off.  Or have you calibrated the fuel flow meter?

    :BC:

     

  12. Yamma-Fox


    Got two on my first day of TW training!  

    Tailwheel caster and springs were rigged REALLY bad.... something anyone with some experience could handle,  but not me on the first day!  Got that (and my mind) set right and pressed on.

    10 years later and waiting for the next opportunity to have my ass handed to me again LOL!

  13. TJay


    You do quite well with the helmet cam. Most I cant even watch but you stay nice and steady so nice work.

    And just to stir the pot a bit I see you pointing at your rpm and air speed ha. my Jabiru runs half those RPM at that speed hahaha  

  14. akflyer


    if it starts lumping up, you can put the cans in some hot water and it will soften up and you can mix it right up and it will smooth right back out again.  Let it cool before you try to mix the 2 parts together though unless you want it to set a lot faster!

    :BC:

     

    1 person likes this
  15. Allen Sutphin


    Oil injection has been used on outboards for years and most 582's use oil injection. But it has to be set up properly. No proof exist (yet) that oil injection causes any kind of bearing wear or failure. Just my opinion and I haven't used it. Would be hard to prove that it causes any problems anyhow.

  16. Dusty


    Rotax have put a lot of thought into their oil injection system (ever noticed the little casting bump in the intake!)it works real well.  We had an issue with one of the club planes with premature wear,the oil injection was immediately blamed. The crank was replaced and This time the oil setup was checked,yup 100:1 AVEREGE oil mix!!!! . PLEASE all 582 owners check the oil is being delivered in the correct quantity (70:1 is good) these engines are incredibly reliable if set up and treated well.

  17. zadwit


    I wrapped the muffler can and hot air outlet hose nd the inlet stack with HD tin foil and used safety wire to secure it.... I will probably remove the tin foil this summer when it warms up....but every little bit make a difference...

    1 person likes this
  18. Matthewtanner


    So there is a possibility I loose some weight!!! I’m gonna try and see if I can go tubeless but I don’t know what kind of wheels I have, been trying to get everything else fixed before I spend money on silly things