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  1. Hawth200


    That's great to know. That will save quite a bit of money being able to reuse the wheels and brakes.

    Does he offer a spring and bungie option? And, If so, any idea what the advantages of each may be?

  2. nlappos


    I think Jim and I have the same gear, built by Lowell Fitt, it is the Highwing LLC gear. I agree with Jim, it makes landings look good, and tolerates much more pilot error while landing smoothly and straight. I also calculated that it is at least as strong as the gear on certified aircraft, and tolerates about 12 feet per second of drop (FAR requires 8 feet per second).

    It is 72" wide to the center of the tires and about 80" wide to the outside. As Jim said it takes the Avid 3/4" axle and the wheel brake assemblies that I had on my Mk IV.

    It also costs about half of what the Grove gear costs. I installed it in an afternoon.

     

     

    IMG_0879.jpg

    analysis4.jpg

    1 person likes this
  3. chopndrag


    I don't know anything but how the controls felt so far. My throttle cables were way to long and pulling unequal bad resulting in me barely getting any climb rate. After I get out there and make cables it'll be another round of testing. Plus I just redid the whole fuel system . New pump , filters, lines the works.

  4. flywise


    Hey Allen,

    I have flown extensively in europe and found when I flew there I had always somewhere I could land if sh*** hit the fan (meadows, river creeks, lake shores, valley in high mountains, corn fields, lots of airfields, etc) .

    When I started flying a C-172 on wheels here in Canada (british columbia) it was the first place I found I often had no place to go if my engine quit.....(big rocks, big forrests and ocean/lakes)

    I did not feel comfortable and decided to go "amphibious"....what a blast. There has not been a single flight where I did not have some water to land on:P . I now fly mostly in remote places and my Catalina may see a runway 5% of the time......I really feel good and safe to be able to drop into a 500feet pond if needed...

    Just my 2 cents..

  5. 1avidflyer


    Well I now have an engine that's firing on all 8 spark plugs.  Here is what I found.  The one ignition module does not work.  Swapped one from another engine. Had one broken wire coming from the charging coils, and one broken ground wire going off a coil.  When I started to remove that coil today, I went to unhook the ground wire, and it pulled off.  There was just some insulation still holding.  Couldn't see it though at a glance.  JImChuk

    3 people like this
  6. akflyer


    I think that's great! A question for the mountain pilots. Do you routinely fly over terrain that you can't land on? I ask this question on my old group when I had my challenger and the major percentage said 'NO'.  I have to fly over stuff that I can't or wouldn't want to land on or in. Otherwise I wouldn't be able to fly. I do put the odds of risk in my favor as much as possible when possible. But sometimes its unavoidable.  Am I the only crazy hillbilly that does this?  I am a perfectionist when it comes to maintaining my engine and aircraft and engines are like wives, if you don't trust them, they aren't worth having. (my opinion, not my wife's). Don't tell her!

    I don't know too many places in the world that you can fly over and NOT have places that you would NOT want to land.  Maybe if you had a runway on the dry lake beds and just circled them you would be ok, but the rest of the world has to fly over terrain that you probly wont have a flyable plane if land there. 

    The higher you fly the more time you have to think about how bad its going to hurt when you ball it up.  I say that is its gonna happen I wanna get it over with quickly and completely :lol:

    I do tend to fly high enough when crossing cook inlet or large bodies of cold water that I can glide to the other side.  The only time I did a little low level scud running over open water on wheels I was sweating like a whore in church and my plane developed the most horrible sounds / vibrations one could imagine.. oh wait, I did imagine them.  Not a fun experience nor one I care to repeat.  I now have the satellite communicator so I can wait out bad weather and tell people where I am at so they don't send good people out into crappy weather to look for me when I am just hanging out in an improvised camp waiting on the weather to clear.  It is a small price to pay every month to not have to put my buddies in danger when they get all excited because I have not returned at the scheduled time.

    :BC:

     

    3 people like this
  7. lv2plyguitar


    I would never get to fly if I was afraid of the terrain around my house.  Basically when transitioning between questionable terrain altitude will be our friend.  I pull the cowling on my craft after every flight and inspect everything. Creeping problems can get out of hand quickly.

    2 people like this
  8. Allen Sutphin


    I think that's great! A question for the mountain pilots. Do you routinely fly over terrain that you can't land on? I ask this question on my old group when I had my challenger and the major percentage said 'NO'.  I have to fly over stuff that I can't or wouldn't want to land on or in. Otherwise I wouldn't be able to fly. I do put the odds of risk in my favor as much as possible when possible. But sometimes its unavoidable.  Am I the only crazy hillbilly that does this?  I am a perfectionist when it comes to maintaining my engine and aircraft and engines are like wives, if you don't trust them, they aren't worth having. (my opinion, not my wife's). Don't tell her!

    1 person likes this
  9. akflyer


    Nice work, Chop!  Wonder how many mph those fairings will yield..

    When I put all the fairings on mine I did not notice a big change in speeds.. but I did notice a big change in climb.  Less drag means a lot better climb!

    :BC:

     

    1 person likes this
  10. akflyer


    Time to update this one!  Last weekend I put the maiden on this bird.  The 670 pulls HARD!   Had a few bugs to work out so I did not get to really put her through the paces much other than playing with prop pitch and 4 or 5 turns around the pattern.  I went with conventional wisdom and set the prop for 6100 on the ground thinking it would unload in the air as it does with the 582.. I was wrong.  It actually loads up more as soon as you start rolling.  Take off and climb out is about 400 RPM less than the static.  I can only figure that the blades are stalling on the ground run and actually loading up once moving. 

    Have a few quirks to work out but man what a sweet flying bird this is!  I can't wait to get home and continue the flight testing and really get to start pushing it a bit and see what she will really do.

    Congrats Bob on building yet another sweet flying bird!

    :BC:

     

    3 people like this
  11. akflyer


    kind of what I figured watching the vids.  Leveling out that runway might help a bunch too, looks like it has some fun rollers in it.  The biplane was scary at best.  reminds me of watching the RC scale masters pilots.  They might be able to build beautiful birds but they can't fly for shit :lol:

     

    :BC:

     

  12. Av8r3400


    damn, you got some tall trees to clear on the approach?  looks like everyone is diving for the runway.  I seriously need to change my work schedule so I can make it down there this year!

    :BC:

     

    The landing path shown in this video turns a very short right base to final, over a tree line, through a narrow cut and finally landing downhill.  It's a challenge.

    The strip is 1200' length in total, including a 200' over run on each end.

    1 person likes this
  13. akflyer


    damn, you got some tall trees to clear on the approach?  looks like everyone is diving for the runway.  I seriously need to change my work schedule so I can make it down there this year!

    :BC:

     

    1 person likes this
  14. 1avidflyer


    Thanks Paul,  I just called them about 20 minutes ago, at least the USA office.  Had to leave a message, but with more searching for info, it seems the US office doesn't do the Rotax work, but it's done in the Netherlands.  I'll see what they say if they call me back.  JImChuk