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  1. TJay


    .But still, not near as strong as a chrome moly cage.

    That could be a good discussion. 

    Why is it that all of these aluminum bold or rivet together air-frames that I see all have a gross weight of 1320 but the old 4130 frames like all our early kitfoxes and avids stop at 1200 Is it usually the landing gear that is the issue

    TJay,  I will be interested to know what you fly your "KF1HH" at during Phase 1 - (Have you thought about using that model number?) - I think it should handle some heavier loads than the standard.  Guess you will put it up to some safe and practical weight? 

    Have you got an empty weight on it?  EDMO

    With the way I have it built if should easily handle 1200 lbs now I see no reason to fly like that but 1050 should cover all the weight I need.

  2. Chris Bolkan


    If you have a power jack like a cigarette lighter outlet or something like that, or easy access to the power buss, put a voltmeter on and measure the voltage with the engine off and then running at a few thousand RPM. It should be 12.X volts off and somewhere between 13 and 14.5 with the engine running several thousand RPM depending on the charge state of the battery. If the voltage gets above 13 the charging system is working. Over time the voltage will rise to higher than 14, but that can take some engine run time at cruise RPM.

    It's really important to know how the ammeter is wired to know if it is working (properly). Remember these engines are only capable of delivering about 15 amps or so at FULL cruise RPM and MUCH lower than that at lesser RPMs. So it is possible if you are running 10 amps of accessories you won't see any current charging the battery. However, since you don't see any current draw when you turn the master on and then turn on accessories, something doesn't sound right.

    Personally I don't see much benefit from an ammeter since the alternator doesn't put out enough current to quickly overcharge the battery. If it were me I'd replace it with a volt meter. Much more informative from my perspective. 

    2 people like this
  3. Turbo


    I'm not convinced we all have this "double-bar" config under the seat.  I know the Avid doesn't.  The axe-handle approach won't work for me.

  4. EDMO


    Seems like I usually needed 2 rings instead of 1 - One to put my hand thru and one to look thru to see what I am doing, or see how bad the bleeding is!   In Avschool we had to safety a turnbuckle inside of a pipe that we couldn't see thru - They had to sterilize mine from all the bleeding I did!  ;<)  I love the new turnbuckles with clips instead of safety wire!    EDMO

    1 person likes this
  5. EDMO


    And more thought goes into the gear design. 

    While perusing parts on Aircraft Spruce I saw all the bolt on axles that Matco makes.  It would take a ton of jig work out of the equation if I built the gear to accept these bolt on axles then you can easily decide what wheels and axles you want to use.  1.25", 1.5" or .75".  For guys that want to go with big tires and are not wanting to be replacing axles all the time you can pick up a set of used clevelands or even new Matco wheels pretty cheap and have a complete bolt on upgrade for better braking power and axles that don't bend.

    Your thoughts?

    :BC:

     

    Grove makes several sizes of bolt-on axles with different bolt patterns too - Not to mention that there are used Cessna, Piper and other bolt-on axles you can use with their wheels or Matco.  I totally agree that the original 3/4" axles are not going to last if you are heavy and bumping rocks, etc. 

    BTW:  I have some new Kitfox 3/4" axles if someone needs them - may have a set of Cessna or Piper axles too - forget what size.   Check Kitfox prices and send me a PM.   EDMO

    Grove gets theirs from Matco.  So does Rans.  I talked with the folks at Matco today about the axles.  Of course, they don't make the various axle sizes with the same bolt pattern so little adapter plates would be needed for anyone wanting the bolt on 3/4" axles.  Can use the same bolt pattern for 1.25" and 1.5"

    Yes, you can get 1.25 and 1.5 with the same bolt pattern - But those size axles on factory planes may have different bolt patterns - usually the 1.25 (Cessna?) are a square pattern, and the 1.5 (Piper?) are a rectangular pattern.   I have had both patterns.   Check Grove catalog for patterns they sell.   Should be simple to make mounting plates with no holes and let the buyer drill them to match their axles if they choose to do that?   EDMO

  6. akflyer


    And more thought goes into the gear design. 

    While perusing parts on Aircraft Spruce I saw all the bolt on axles that Matco makes.  It would take a ton of jig work out of the equation if I built the gear to accept these bolt on axles then you can easily decide what wheels and axles you want to use.  1.25", 1.5" or .75".  For guys that want to go with big tires and are not wanting to be replacing axles all the time you can pick up a set of used clevelands or even new Matco wheels pretty cheap and have a complete bolt on upgrade for better braking power and axles that don't bend.

    Your thoughts?

    :BC:

     

    Grove makes several sizes of bolt-on axles with different bolt patterns too - Not to mention that there are used Cessna, Piper and other bolt-on axles you can use with their wheels or Matco.  I totally agree that the original 3/4" axles are not going to last if you are heavy and bumping rocks, etc. 

    BTW:  I have some new Kitfox 3/4" axles if someone needs them - may have a set of Cessna or Piper axles too - forget what size.   Check Kitfox prices and send me a PM.   EDMO

    Grove gets theirs from Matco.  So does Rans.  I talked with the folks at Matco today about the axles.  Of course, they don't make the various axle sizes with the same bolt pattern so little adapter plates would be needed for anyone wanting the bolt on 3/4" axles.  Can use the same bolt pattern for 1.25" and 1.5"

  7. EDMO


    And more thought goes into the gear design. 

    While perusing parts on Aircraft Spruce I saw all the bolt on axles that Matco makes.  It would take a ton of jig work out of the equation if I built the gear to accept these bolt on axles then you can easily decide what wheels and axles you want to use.  1.25", 1.5" or .75".  For guys that want to go with big tires and are not wanting to be replacing axles all the time you can pick up a set of used clevelands or even new Matco wheels pretty cheap and have a complete bolt on upgrade for better braking power and axles that don't bend.

    Your thoughts?

    :BC:

     

    Grove makes several sizes of bolt-on axles with different bolt patterns too - Not to mention that there are used Cessna, Piper and other bolt-on axles you can use with their wheels or others.  I totally agree that the original 3/4" axles are not going to last if you are heavy and bumping rocks, etc.  Isn't that is what Bush Gear is for?

    BTW:  I have some new Kitfox 3/4" axles if someone needs them - may have a set of Cessna or Piper axles too - forget what size.   Check Kitfox prices and send me a PM.   EDMO

  8. akflyer


    Everything on my bird goes through the amp gauge so I know how much juice everything is pulling and it also shows when charging or a flashing light if its discharging.  Its an EI gauge of ? ?  vintage.  It is heavy though and will get tossed soon and replaced with something much newer and lighter.

    :BC:

     

  9. marcusofcotton


    ...and when your battery has fully recovered, your reading is going to show the actual electric consumption of the different consumers you have switched on.

    Maybe... it depends on how it is wired. Most cars for instance, will only tell you the amount of current going into or from the battery. The devices that are running will not register. I've seen airplanes with the ampere gauges wired like flywise says and I've seen them like most cars have. As Chris  stated, one really needs to have a schematic to know what it should be reading. But it definitely should be reading. :-)

  10. Chris Bolkan


    Dude...The amount of (quality) work you are getting done and the speed you are doing it amazes me. I am jealous. Your shop isn't bad either :-)

    BTW, how difficult was it to remove your spar stiffeners? I'm about to tackle that on my plane. I want to replace the existing stiffeners with longer to hopefully reduce wing flex.

    Thanks!

    Chris

     

  11. akflyer


    One other thought.  Put on more inspection rings at potential places you will have to get to.  Pitot tube, strut brackets etc.  Don't cut them out till you need to get in there (at some point you will) but now is the time to put the rings on really easy at opposed to doing them later when its all nice paint and you have to get in there for some reason (joey is not the first person to blow the line off the pitot tube connection in the wing)  :lol: I think I ended up with 9 ring locations on each of my wings so I could get in and inspect things in the future if needed.  Another place to think about putting them in is where the drag tubes attach to spars.  The bent and flattened tubes have a known history of cracking and breaking so being able to get in there to look or possibly repair is kind of nice.

    :BC:

     

  12. akflyer


    Looking good.  I do have one thought though.  With the sticks being straight I don't think you will be able to get full deflection on the roll especially if you have a passenger.  They are curved and offset for a pretty good reason.  I do have a spare stick and a tubing bender that will bend them without deforming the tube so I could make a couple sticks for you if you would like.  I would hate to see a lot of work go down the shitter and you get hurt because you could not get your leg out of the way to give full input on short final and a gusty cross wind.  Mine only had 1 stick when I got it and I tried using a straight stick on the passenger side so my son could fly... that lasted about 1 minute into the flight and I pulled the pin and the stick.

    That leads me to thought #2 on the passenger stick using a quick pin to hold it in will make it really easy to the passenger to get in and out and put the stick in place once in the seat.  Or if its a larger person with meaty thighs you can pull the stick and shove it under the seat.

    I am very interested in how it performs with that engine as well.  Akflyerbob has one being rebuilt at the factory right now to put in his Mod II KF.  I am hoping it perfroms like I think it will!

     

    Keep at it, you are getting close to getting her in the air.

     

    :BC:

     

  13. akflyer


    For that matter... for the guys that have 3/4" axles on the tube gear now it would be easy to put a flat plate on the end of your 3/4" axle you have now then bolt the new larger axles onto that plate.  A gusset or two and your in business pretty darn cheap.  The new gear would already come out with the plate welded in place so you could choose what size axle you want to bolt on.

    :BC:

     

    2 people like this
  14. akflyer


    And more thought goes into the gear design. 

    While perusing parts on Aircraft Spruce I saw all the bolt on axles that Matco makes.  It would take a ton of jig work out of the equation if I built the gear to accept these bolt on axles then you can easily decide what wheels and axles you want to use.  1.25", 1.5" or .75".  For guys that want to go with big tires and are not wanting to be replacing axles all the time you can pick up a set of used clevelands or even new Matco wheels pretty cheap and have a complete bolt on upgrade for better braking power and axles that don't bend.

    Your thoughts?

    :BC:

     

  15. flywise


    Hey Neloner,

    With your master switch OFF you should see the needle on the zero mark.

    when you switch your master ON you should read a discharge on your gauge (needle showing about 2 amps left of zero). As soon as you have started your engine your needle should go to the positive charge side (right side of zero) and recharge your battery + feed the electric consumers. You will have a higher reading just after starting and when your battery has fully recovered, your reading is going to show the actual electric consumption of the different consumers you have switched on.

    If your alternator or regulator fails you will read a negative value (left of zero) even with engine running.

    Cheers.

  16. Neloner


    Ok, so my electrical skills are probably my achilles heel of wrenching on planes. Have a 912ULS in the plane, runs great, but I have no reading on my amperage gauge when its running, or ever for that matter. Needle does not move. All the connections on the rear of the gauge are made and it lights up with the panes. What readings should it be showing when running or not running with the master on?

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