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Let's talk gear geometry

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Posted (edited)

JF - and I think I could pronounce your name, but you would laugh at my attempt to write the spoken words in American! Half of my ancestors were from Quebec and Arcadia...

4130 is the strongest for the weight, weldable, most cost effective, steel that we can get for our planes.

Some guns are made from 4130, or the 400 series and other Stainless equivalents.

Do you have any alternative suggestions?

Some of us on here have a background in metallurgy and welding.

EDMO

Our planes could be made stronger and heavier, but they might not get off of the ground - Like the African tank! :lol:

EdMO

BTW: I saw some Hydrosorb parts on ebay today...

Edited by Ed In Missouri
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Posted

4130 is a very pliant metal, yes. That is what makes it perfect for aircraft. It will bend rather than break. It is also very light, due to its strength, compared to other alloys.

A rubber bump-stop would be a great idea.

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Posted

4140 sound good for that job...and i take some info on net for reinforcement on fuselage around the gear attach section ..i want to make it before covering..

Jf

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Posted

What is hydrosorb???

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Posted (edited)

What is hydrosorb???

Maybe some others can explain it better than I can:  Some Pipers and other planes had a gear that used something like the shock absorbers used on cars instead of the bungee cords.  It was supposed to be a better system.  I don't know if it is only shocks or contains springs with the shocks.    EDMO

Edited by EDMO

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Posted

What is hydrosorb???

Maybe some others can explain it better than I can:  Some Pipers and other planes had a gear that used something like the shock absorbers used on cars instead of the bungee cords.  It was supposed to be a better system.  I don't know if it is only shocks or contains springs with the shocks.    EDMO

The hydrosorbs were used in conjunction with the bungees on the pipers.  Its just basically an inline shock.

:BC:

 

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Posted

I finally got to do a little playing with the gear. I made a mock-up and ran some tests, and here is what I found, or think I found anyhow. I documented what I did, and since the file is long, instead of posting it here and taking up space, I have attached it as a .doc file. If you are interested, you can read it, if not, ignore it. I figure if you guys find anything wrong, you'll soon let me know.


Bob Landing Gear Geometry.doc

Landing Gear Geometry.doc

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Posted (edited)

I finally got to do a little playing with the gear. I made a mock-up and ran some tests, and here is what I found, or think I found anyhow. I documented what I did, and since the file is long, instead of posting it here and taking up space, I have attached it as a .doc file. If you are interested, you can read it, if not, ignore it. I figure if you guys find anything wrong, you'll soon let me know.


Bob Landing Gear Geometry.doc

Landing Gear Geometry.doc

This sounds like a good one to get Leni and his CAD mechanical engineers working on?  I think he had already figured that the cabane had to be lowered?   EDMO

Edited by EDMO
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Posted

I am going to try to build a set of gear to the dimensions and angles used on the Piper Cub. Has anybody built gear where the front leg comes straight down from the fuselage instead of leaning forward 3 7/8 inch. This would put the mains a bit farther back. It would make the gear leg and the cabane easier to build.\

It would make the tailwheel come up faster but what other effects might it have?

 

Bob

 

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Posted

That is the way I had my new tall gear built with no defects and would do so again.

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