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How to rebuild a Bing 54 Carb

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Posted

I just rebuilt another set of Bings from my Powered Parachute. These were a perfect example of what today's nasty fuel does to a carb when they sit. I decided to take the opportunity to do a basic write up on how a Bing 54 works and how to rebuild it.

DISCLAIMER: I am not a licensed aircraft maintainer. Work on your stuff at your own risk!

You will need to use your own judgement on when to do this task. If you pick up a plane that's been sitting for a while I would tear into the carbs before ever trying to start it. Brian Carpenter also recommends replacing the needle itself and clip every 200 hrs because they are always vibrating around inside the carb causing wear which will eventually change your mixture.

What you will need:

Flat Blade Screwdriver

8 and 10 mm end wrench

Small punch

Can of carb cleaner

Compressed air is nice but not needed

Remove the carbs from your plane and take home where you have a clean area to work and good lighting. I like to use an old towel underneath. The small parts involved won't bounce and disappear if you drop them.

I buy my rebuild kits from www.bearkperkins.com as he has the best prices. The kit contains the following items. Idler jet O ring, Air Screw O ring, Float bowl gasket, Carb top gasket, Throttle cable rubber, Valve with Viton Tip, Sieve Screen, and a new pin for the float bracket

IMG_0281_2.jpg

When you remove the float bowl you will see the following

Challenger_01745_1.jpg

These carbs are pretty straight forward to dissemble. I recommend only doing one at a time so you can use the other one as a guide if you can't figure out how something goes back together.

Now this is the reason why cleaning these out and looking inside once in a while is important. As you can see in the picture my main jet was nearly plugged. The main jet influences the fuel curve at wide open throttle. Most likely I would not have noticed this at all during warm up and run ups because it's not doing anything. The problem arises when you go to full power for takeoff. The crud in the jet effectively leans the mixture and 500ft up just past the end of the runway you cook a piston due to not enough fuel. 

IMG_0288.jpg

The same issue arises with the idler jet only it's worse because the orifice in the idle circuit is tiny. It doesn't take much to plug it solid and your plane won't want to even hardly run.

IMG_0291.jpg

Back of the main jet

IMG_0287.jpg

Once disassembled you will have the following parts.

From top to bottom: Jet Stock, Needle jet, Main jet, idle jet, air screw, Sieve Screen

IMG_0289.jpg

Clean all these thoroughly with carb cleaner and be 100% sure there's no crud in them.

These are some old vs. new pics to show you how deteriorated this stuff can get when it sits.

IMG_0286_1.jpg

Vent hoses are supposed to have holes in the bottom of them but NOT a big split like this.

IMG_0285_1.jpg

My cork float bowl gaskets were totally shot

IMG_0284_1.jpg

The orange tip is the old one. This is the device that opens and closes with the floats allowing fuel to enter the carb from the fuel line. When the floats lift up the rubber tip plugs the hole. You can see where it's worn.

IMG_0283_1.jpg

Sieve screen. This little guy is critical to the proper operation of the carb. It takes out the bubbles from the fuel entering the carb and provides a steady stream  of fuel. They dry out and rot as well.

IMG_0282_1.jpg

Idle jet. The new O ring goes right below the screw head.

IMG_0292.jpg

Pretty typical exterior...carb cleaner and a toothbrush does wonders

IMG_0294.jpg

New components installed

IMG_0295.jpg

Use your punch to pop the pin out that holds the float arms. Note how the tiny clip holds the valve to the float arms so you can put it back together the right way.

All cleaned up

IMG_0297.jpg

Take the time to set your idle screw and airscrews back where they were or at least the same so you have a starting point.

Attached is a good article on the Bing and how it works from Mike Stattman. I hope this helps someone.

 

Tuning the Bing.pdf

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Posted

Sweet!  Thank you Joey.

Great job with the graphics too!:BC:

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Posted

Thanks Joey.  Nice pics and explanations.  

Do you blow out or ream any passages in the carb body?  Anything needed on the enricher circuit?  On the slide side, do you do anything to inspect the needle, replace the O-rings or anything?  I'm asking because I'm just coming up on 200 hrs and want to catch everything I can.

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Posted

Old thread but I have a question, I have never seen that screen in any of the Rotax 912 carbs I have rebuilt. Is it specific only to the Bing 54?

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Posted

The Bing 64s on the 912 engines do not have the screen.

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Posted

Well, that's a relief!!! I sure didn't see them in the several times I have taken these carbs apart and thought maybe I missed something...I'll blame it on getting older. ;)

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Posted

WOW, excellent post.  One of the most informative and well written "how to" post.   The pics are excellent. 

Thanks a ton for sharing this.

Charlie

 

 

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Posted

Great how to! I'll be ordering the carb kit soon. Thanks for taking the time to make this write up.

Brooks

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Posted

Good reminder Mr.  I just put in an order to Bear so I can rebuild the fuel pump and the carbs before I stick them on the new engine.  All new fuel and primer lines as well.  Hope to keep her from going silent on me in the future :lol:

 

:BC:

 

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Posted

The correct web site is www.bearperkins.com for the carb kits.

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Posted

That junk in the jet is more likely corrosion do to the ethanol. Either drain the bowls or do what I do, run non eth fuel. And I cut the fuel and run it dry.

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