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Installing elevator and rudder hinge pins

9 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Have you struggled with this?  It seems that when you stretch the fabric on the elevator and rudder, it slightly distorts things and makes it hard to get the pins in.  Last week I put those parts back on my Avid and this is what I came up with that made it much easier.  Took an old 3/16" bolt, cut the head off, and tapered the other end.  Drove the tapered end in first, then followed it with the hinge pin.  The taper helped line the hinge parts up, and the hinge pin followed through.  To drive the pins in I used a 2' long piece of 1/4" x 1" strap I had handy.  Held the strap perpendicularly to the pin and pounded on the edge of the strap close to the elevator or rudder.  JImChuk

PS  sorry I put this post in the wrong section. Should have gone into the technical tasks section.  Maybe someone can move it??? 

Photo08223 (2).jpg

Edited by 1avidflyer
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Posted (edited)

Looks like a good place for it to me.  Sounds a lot easier than getting the tubing into, or out of, the hinges.   EDMO 

Edited by EDMO

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Posted (edited)

Good stuff! I am not a fan of that task! Moved over to technical tasks. 

Edited by C5Engineer

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Posted

Great idea! About to need it as I pull and inspect each of my elevator and rudder pins, thanks! We used to call them "drift pins" or "fids" once upon a time.

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Posted (edited)

Nick,  You may know this, but writing it for everyone's info:  I have read that some of the original elevator and rudder bushings were made from a "Poly" tubing which is a softer material than Nylon tubing.  I think that Kitfox may have issued a Service Letter on this?   I found wear on my KF2 bushings after only 75 hours of use, and replaced them with Nylon tubing.  This could have been caused by slight misalignment, and I don't know what kind of bushings were in it originally.  I am sure you will check the bushings for wear while you have the tail apart.  I doubt that you will find wear on the pins, but would be interested in hearing what you find.  Are you supposed to lube those pins?  EDMO 

Edited by EDMO
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Posted

If anyone needs that bushing material let me know. I bought 25ft of it....lifetime supply for about 30 airplanes. It was the smallest roll I could find that was the right OD/ID

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Posted

EDMO, 

Thanks for the info, I didn't know but would have found out!  The pins all look good externally, but the bird is 23 years old so it's worth a peek.

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Posted

Just a reminder guys that your rudder cables use this same material in the guides all the way down the fuse. I found mine were clear through at one point and the cable was rubbing on the metal tube. Also these ones are required to be split to get over the cable and they naturally tend to rotate to where the split goes around the cable. The ones right behind the doors have the most load on them due to the angle and are easy to inspect.

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Posted (edited)

Just a reminder guys that your rudder cables use this same material in the guides all the way down the fuse. I found mine were clear through at one point and the cable was rubbing on the metal tube. Also these ones are required to be split to get over the cable and they naturally tend to rotate to where the split goes around the cable. The ones right behind the doors have the most load on them due to the angle and are easy to inspect.

One idea on splitting the tubing - cut it on an angle, so the slit will never completely line up with the cable.  My forward ones by the doors got completely worn into on KF2, so on my new build I changed those tubes to 3/4" in order to put thicker Nylon bushings there and to help with the misalignment that most of them have.   If you are replacing the cables, you don't have to split the tubes.  EDMO

Edited by EDMO

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